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a b c d e f g h
8 a8 rd b8 nd c8 bd d8 qd e8 kd f8 bd g8 nd h8 rd 8
7 a7 pd b7 pd c7 pd d7 pd e7 pd f7 pd g7 pd h7 pd 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 pl c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 pl b2 c2 pl d2 pl e2 pl f2 pl g2 pl h2 pl 2
1 a1 rl b1 nl c1 bl d1 ql e1 kl f1 bl g1 nl h1 rl 1
a b c d e f g h
The Polish Opening.
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 rd b8 nd c8 bd d8 qd e8 kd f8 bd g8 nd h8 rd 8
7 a7 pd b7 pd c7 pd d7 pd e7 f7 pd g7 pd h7 pd 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 pd f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 pl c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 pl b2 bl c2 pl d2 pl e2 pl f2 pl g2 pl h2 pl 2
1 a1 rl b1 nl c1 d1 ql e1 kl f1 bl g1 nl h1 rl 1
a b c d e f g h
The Polish Opening after 1. b4 e5 2. Bb2.

In chess, the Polish Opening (also known as the Sokolsky opening) is the opening where White plays

  1. b4

It is the ninth most popular opening. It derives its name from Russian player Alexey Sokolsky, who wrote a monograph on this opening. Usually, white will play this opening to fianchetto the queenside bishop. This openings has some tactics, like black can play e5, attacking White's b4 pawn with the bishop. White can ignore his/her hanging b-pawn and play Bb2, fianchettoing the bishop and attacking Black's e-pawn. Black can capture White's b-pawn, but then White will capture Black's e-pawn and Black will have to play Bf8, Nf6, or f6, otherwise Black's kingside rook will be trapped after Bxg7. Black does not have to capture White's b-pawn though and can instead defend his/her e-pawn with d6 (which is usually the best move for Black) or Nc6. The problem with defending with Nc6 is that White can play b5, kicking the knight out. If black moves the knight to d4, it can be kicked out again with e3, and even though Black can now take White's pawn on b5, Black's e-pawn will still be taken. The reverse of this opening is the Polish Defense, where White starts with d4 and black responds with b5.

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