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a b c d e f g h
8 a8 kd b8 c8 d8 e8 rl f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 kl c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
White moved his rook to e8, which checkmates the black king. The game is over and White wins.

Checkmate is any position in chess and other similar games, in which a king that is in check cannot move out of check, block the check with other pieces, or capture the checking piece. It signifies the end of the game. The checkmate is the primary and the only aim in a chess game. However, in games with grandmasters, checkmate rarely occurs, because in most games, a player resigns before that happens, or a draw is agreed. The word checkmate comes from shāh māt (شاه مات), a Persian word meaning that "the King is helpless".

Checkmate is different from stalemate, where the king is NOT in check but cannot legally move either his King or any of his other pieces.

In algebraic notation, checkmate is recorded using the hashtag symbol "#", for example, 62.Qc1#.

Basic Checkmates[]

Mating with two rooks[]

a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 kd d5 e5 f5 g5 rl h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 rl 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 kl h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Mating with two rooks (ladder mate).

This checkmate is very simple to deliver. In the diagram (right), while the white rook in g5 checks the black king, the other rook in h4 forces him to move towards the edge of the board. Then the sequence is continued with Rh6+, Rg7+, etc.

Obviously, rotated or reversed schemes allow anyway to checkmate. This is called a ladder mate (ladder checkmate).

Mating with Queen and King vs King[]

a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 kd g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 qd f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 kl h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Queen and King vs King checkmate.

The basic idea is to force the opposing King into the corner by placing the queen just near enough to the opposing king to restrict his movement to either moving staying within two squares diagonal to each other (e.g. If the queen is on e4, the king is on f5 and the opposing king is on g3, it can only move between g3 and f2 without moving closer to the corner), and then moving his own king to force the opposing king further into the corner. At this point, care must be taken not to stalemate the king, as it is very easy to stalemate in this position.

Finally, when the king is at the side or at the corner, the kings should be maneuvered such that they are directly opposite each other while it is his turn to move, again, make sure to not create a stalemate position. Then, a simple checkmate can be played by checking the opposing king using the Queen on a vertical level.

Video[]

Chess_Move_Types_Checkmate

Chess Move Types Checkmate

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